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Language

Language

Contrast between Literature and Language

Language and Literature are two words that appear similar in their purport but strictly speaking they are not so. Language can be simply defined as the study of sounds, words, and sentences whereas literature are the study of written work. Language is one of the best inventions of mankind, without which we won’t be able to share our knowledge, opinions, ideas, feelings, or express anger, excitement, nervousness, fears, with another person. Language is the fundamental unit of literature. In other words, it can be said that language makes literature. Here we are not just talking about vocal language, but all the systems used as a medium for communication.

Literature can be understood as any body of knowledge, present in written form which is used to express one’s thoughts, opinions, and ideas, about culture, tradition, life experiences, etc. with the use of language. Literature is produced by the creation of works in a particular language by the writers of the language. This is the main difference between language and literature.

The contrast between Literature and Language

Language

  • Language is an abstract system of symbols and meanings governed by grammatical rules. It is all about sounds, signs, symbols, words, and grammar.
  • A language comprises of sounds, words, and sentences. The manner in which the words combine to form sentences is important in any language.
  • The language implies any form of expression or communication, by the living organisms through arbitrary signals. It is expressive in nature as it helps the living organisms to express their thoughts and feelings, with one another.
  • Language means the system of verbal or non-verbal signs which are used by living beings, so as to convey information, feelings, thoughts, etc.
  • Language differs from society to society and region to region, and each language possesses a unique dialect. It is that abstract system which helps in discourse. It serves various purposes, right from the casual discourse to acquiring knowledge.
  • Language triggers interaction between living beings.
  •  The language experts are said to be well versed in grammar and prosody of the particular language.

Literature

  • Literature refers to written works, especially those considered to be of superior or lasting artistic value. While literature consists of written works of the writers with intellectual thoughts and contemplation.
  • Literature refers to the body of the written or spoken composition, of a specific kind, on a particular topic. It is made up of the thoughts expressed in any given language.
  • Literature is imaginative in the sense that the writer of the material uses his imagination, to produce the work. It refers to any sort of written or spoken material, regarded as an art form, which has some intellectual value, due to the use of language in a manner, which is different from its normal usage.
  • The common forms of literature are novel, poem, short story, drama, prose, biography, autobiography, memoir, play, essay, etc. It is purely based on life experiences, i.e. what one has faced, experienced, felt, dreamt, etc in his/her life. These forms of literature use words in a very influential, effective, and thought-provoking manner.
  • Literature often encourages recreation, revelation, and introspection of thoughts, facts, and imaginations of the writer.
  • Experts of any given language produce high-quality literature in that particular language.
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Language

Post Creole Continuum

Post Creole Continuum represents the range of dialectal variations found in many creole-speaking communities. It also known as the creole continuum. It was coined by linguist David DeCamp, “Toward a Generative Analysis of a Post-Creole Speech Continuum” in Pidginization and Creolization of Languages, in 1971. Due to social, political, and economic factors, a creole language can decreolize towards one of the languages from which it is descended, aligning its morphology, phonology, and syntax to the local standard of the dominant language but to different degrees depending on a speaker’s status.

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Language

Official Language

Official Language is approved by the government of a country, taught in schools, and used in legal and official documents. It is a language that is given a special legal status in a particular country, state, or other jurisdiction. Official Language that is also an indigenous language is called endoglossic, one that is not indigenous is exoglossic. An instance is Nigeria which has three endoglossic official languages.

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Language

Language Change

Language Change is largely regular One can recognise regularities in the types of change which languages undergo, even if these cannot be predicted. It offers insights into the nature of language itself. In historical linguistics has traditionally been concerned with how languages evolve and not why they do so in one particular direction and not in another. Language Change is the notion of drift, an imperceptible and slow movement in a particular direction which a language can show over centuries and which can change its typology.

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Language

Gender Neutral Language

Gender Neutral Language is important in feminism. It became a common feature in written and spoken versions of many languages in the late twentieth century. It is also important to people who have non-binary gender identities. Gender Neutral Language doesn’t give the idea that a person is male or female, it can also apply to people who identify as other genders, outside of the gender binary. The use of gender-neutral language boosts effective communication by including all possible readers, making the message more accessible.

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Language

Linguistic Rights

Linguistic Rights is argued that the general assimilation or equation between language rights and human rights is not only erroneous as far as it is inaccurate, but it leads to a distorted image of the relationship between law and politics. It includes, among others, the right to one’s own language in legal, administrative and judicial acts, language education, and media in a language understood and freely chosen by those concerned. Linguistic Rights became more and more prominent throughout the course of history as language came to be increasingly seen as a part of nationhood.

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Language

Linguistic Purism

This article describe about Linguistic Purism, which is a form of prescriptive linguistics. It is often presented as conservative, as a “protection” of a language from the “aggression” of other languages or of “conservation” of the national Volksgeist, but is often innovative in defining a new standard. It is sometimes part of governmental language policy which is enforced in various ways. Linguistic Purism is a pejorative term in linguistics for a zealous conservatism in regard to the use and development of a language.

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Language

Abstand and Ausbau Languages

Abstand and Ausbau Languages means to speak of language settings in which speakers or a portion thereof feel their language to be ‘‘threatened’’ — and therefore in need of assistance. It is a tool used in sociolinguistics to analyse and categorise the distinctiveness of related language varieties. It is intended to deal with situations in which multiple varieties from a dialect continuum have been standardized, so that they are commonly considered distinct languages even though they may be mutually intelligible.

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Language

Language Planning

Language Planning is frequently undertaken for the expressed purpose of solving communication problems. It refers to deliberate efforts to influence the behavior of others with respect to the acquisition, structure, or functional allocation of their language codes. The goals of language planning differ depending on the nation or organization, but generally include making planning decisions and possibly changes for the benefit of communication. Language Planning decisions have a major impact on language vitality and, ultimately, on the rights of the individual.

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Language

Language Revitalization

Language Revitalization is an emerging field, its theoretical foundations as well as its models of practice are still developing. Many publications are devoted to the fundamental task of increasing the knowledge base by reporting on revitalization projects on specific languages, often in specific communities. It is an attempt to halt or reverse the decline of a language or to revive an extinct one. Language Revitalization is often deemed necessary because of the sheer amount of linguistic diversity being lost. In recent times, it is estimated that more than 2000 languages have already become extinct around the world.

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